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Tufts Workshop: The Value of Therapeutic Space Planning

By Laurie Moskowitz-Corrois, LMHC, REAT "Have you ever wondered why you “feel” more comfortable in certain environments? Is it the people in the space? Is it an aesthetic? The type of work that’s being done? Perhaps the music? Maybe it’s the lighting, the colors, the furniture placement, the art on the walls, or could it be our own energy and what we bring to the space? My response would be Yes!" All of this and more help to support an environment and tap into its inherent potential, it’s therapeutic nature. Therapeutic space could be defined simply as space designed and created with intention and purpose, an environment that supports the well being of those utilizing the space. Each room at TCR has been thoughtfully and carefully developed to support and enhance the personal and collective experience of our children, teens, and families. As the largest bereavement center in the northeast, The Children’s Room is recognized by many as a model in the community, reflecting the importance and value of therapeutic space planning. Creating a warm, inviting, grounded space begins with a trust of the space itself, a “felt sense” for the energy in the space. The concept of Therapeutic Space Planning is based on an understanding of valuing and respecting the environment, being aware of the purpose of the space, and then, with intention, supporting it to its full potential. In turn, the space reflects back the feeling of purpose, care, and the relationship it offers to those of us using and experiencing it. Oftentimes, the energy experienced in interior space is subliminal, more of a “felt-sense” than a visual one. Sometimes it can be misunderstood as an environment that is simply “organized” or “well designed.” However, there is an important [...]

By |August 24th, 2018|Categories: Art, News, Newsletter, Resources|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Simmons Alumni and Professional Development Day Features The Children’s Room

On Friday, April 17th, the alumni of the Simmons College School of Social Work will be treated to several presentations from reprentatives from The Children's Room as part of the college's alumni programming. The Keynote Speaker for the event is one of the founding board members of The Children's Room Phyllis Silverman who will present on the topic of How Our Views Have Changed. Phyllis continues to research current issues on child bereavement and leads the research committee at The Children's Room.  The committee is comprised of professionals from Tufts University, Wheelock College, Harvard University and other programs. Program Director Donna Sharff and Program Manager Colleen Shannon will present an interactive and inspiring workshop session on The Heart of Grief: Facilitating Creative Arts Expression in Grieving Children and Teenagers. The day long conference concludes with a performance by The Children's Room Teen Performance Troupe. For more information on the conference, visit the Simmons website.

Words That Help, Words That Hurt – What To Say To Someone Grieving

Our Parents Council, a group of "alumni" parents and other caring parents come together for workshops on a variety of topics.  The following information was compiled from their recent workshop. Words That Don't Help We have all been hurt by people saying or doing the wrong things in response to the tragic loss of a loved one.  It often times makes things more difficult and can cause more pain and anger.  Some common examples are: “You are the man of the house now and you need to take care of your mother” “How are you?” “Your loved one is at peace now.” “God gives you what you can handle.” “I know exactly how you feel.” “Everything happens for a reason.” “They are in a better place.” “You need to be strong for the kids.” We all agreed that people in general don’t know what to say, so often times they say the wrong things and these comments can be very hurtful.  There are words that can heal and there are words that hurt.  People are not trying to be malicious but they are uncomfortable around you and often times say the wrong things. Words That Help There are many things that can be said that will help and here is a list of them. “I don’t know what to say” “I am thinking about you” “I will keep you in my thoughts and prayers” “I am here for you” “I don’t know how you feel but I am here to help in any way I can”. Sometimes a hug or a gesture of kindness is better than saying anything.  Don’t wait for the person to ask for help.  Do something that you think will help [...]

Upcoming Workshop: Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Death, and Other Stressful Life Events

This workshop is open to the public and is ideal for teachers and other professionals who work with children of all ages. Wednesday, February 18, 2009, 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm (Fee: $25, payable on-line or in person) Location: The Children’s Room, 1210 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, MA To register, email cshannon@childrensroom.org.  RSVPs are essential as space is limited to create an interactive experience. […]